Events Digest

MARCH 2015

March 20: Symposium on “Transition, Scale and Catastrophe” 

9-4 PM  International Brotherhood of Teamsters Room, Gelman Library 7th floor, With Stacy Alaimo, Stephanie LeMenager, Steve Mentz, Karl Steel, Anne Harris and filmmaker Lynn Tomlinson.

March 20: Early Modern Global History Seminar, Georgetown University

Jason Sharples, Department of History, Catholic University, “The World That Fear Made: Imagination and Power in Early American Slave Conspiracies”

All seminars will meet on the Georgetown campus on Fridays from 4-5:30, followed by a social hour. Papers are circulated in advance. All students, faculty, and independent scholars are invited to attend. Please email Alison Games (gamesa@georgetown.edu) if you wish to have your name added to the seminar’s email list.

March 20: Lunch Bite object talk – A pair of Japanese Imari porcelain bowls

12:30 p.m. and free admission. Join Kendall Casey, museum education manager, as she presents a pair of Imari bowls and the history of this type of Japanese porcelain.  The eighteenth-century bowls were acquired by Larz and Isabel Anderson for the Dining Room of their Washington home and remain on view there today. This talk will take place at 2118 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington.

March 23: Washington History Seminar

Martha Hodes (NYU) on Mourning Lincoln   

Report from the Field: Sharita Thompson on the Hill’s Center Emancipation Day program

March 25: Lecture – “Gilded Age and American Renaissance Palaces” by Richard Guy Wilson

6 p.m. and free admission. Richard Guy Wilson, Commonwealth Professor and Chair, Department of Architectural History, University of Virginia, investigates the design and architecture of the extravagant homes built between the Civil War and World War I, focusing on houses in Newport and Washington, D.C., including Anderson House. This talk will take place at 2118 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington.

March 26: Georgetown Institute for Global History International History Seminar

Tommaso Piffer (Research Fellow, Higher School of Economics), “The Allies and the European Resistance in WWII”

The seminar will meet on Thursday, March 26, 2015 from 6:15-7:45 in the Mortara Center for International Studies at the corner of N and 36th Streets, NW (3600 N St., Washington, DC). Papers will be pre-circulated among participants. Light refreshments will be served.

March 28: DC-Area African American Studies Works-In-Progress Seminar

The next meeting of the DC-Area African American Studies Works-In-Progress Seminar is just two weeks away.  It will meet on Saturday, 28 March 2015 from 2-5 pm at the Teamsters’ Archive in George Washington University’s Gellman Library, 7th floor.

A week prior to the meeting, Jay Driskell, Assisntant Professor of History at Hood College, will be sending out the two papers for the next seminar.  These will be by Francis Gourrier (University of Wisconsin) and Tony Perry (University of Maryland).

March 30: Washington History Seminar

Bruce Kuklick (University of Pennsylvania) on Death in the Congo: Murdering Patrice Lumumba

APRIL 2015

April 2: German Historical Institute Spring Lecture Series

Wolfgang Krieger (University of Marburg) “Parliamentary Oversight of Intelligence: The German Experience”

The German Historical Institute’s Spring Lecture Series 2015, “Intelligence Services and Civil Liberties: Security and Privacy in Historical Perspective,” organized in cooperation with the National History Center, seeks to explore these issues in a comparative and historical perspective. Our speakers will examine how democratic governments in Germany, the United States, and Switzerland have grappled with balancing the need for security and citizens’ rights.

All lectures begin at 6:30 pm (refreshments will be served from 6:00 to 6:30 pm) and will be held at the German Historical Institute, 1607 New Hampshire Avenue NW. Please RSVP (acceptances only) by Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.

April 2: The Indians’ Capital City: Native Histories of Washington D.C.

Kluge Fellow Joseph Genetin-Pilawa presents part of his larger study of the Indigenous histories of Washington, D.C. Genetin-Pilawa argues that far from the passive victims or violent interlopers depicted in much of the iconography of the capital, visiting Native diplomats and as well as residents in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries engaged with the messages encoded on the urban landscape.

The talk will be held at 4:00p.m. on April 2, 2015 in LJ-119 on the first floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress.

April 9: Annual Jay I. Kislak Lecture “Shedding Light on Antiquity: The Forensic Imaging and Study of Ancient, Medieval and Modern Manuscripts”

A lecture by Michael Toth, President, R.B. Toth Associates, followed by a roundtable discussion with Kislak collection curator John Hessler, Mike Toth, William Noel (University of Pennsylvania), Chet Van Duzer (John Carter Brown Research Fellow) and Fenella France (Chief, Preservation, Research & Testing Division, Library of Congress).

The lecture will be held at 6:30p.m. on April 9, 2015 in the L. Quincy Mumford Room on the sixth floor of the James Madison Memorial Building of the Library of Congress.

April 9-10: “Entangled Trajectories: Integrating European and Native American Histories”

Elizabeth Boone will deliver a public lecture at the Mexican Cultural Institute on April 9 at 6:45, and there will be sessions at George Washington University on April 9 and 10. Confirmed speakers include: Ned Blackhawk (Yale University); Galen Brokaw (Montana State University), Margaret Bruchac (University of Pennsylvania), Matt Cohen (University of Texas, Austin), Nancy Farriss (University of Pennsylvania), Karen Graubart (University of Notre Dame), Byron Hamann (Ohio State University), Dana Leibsohn (Smith College), James Maffie (University of Maryland), Barbara Mundy (Fordham), Nancy van Deusen (Queen’s University), Birgit Brander Rasmussen (Yale University), David Silverman, (George Washington University), Molly Warsh  (University of Pittsburgh).

The conference is organized by the Early Americas Working Group and co-sponsored by the Kislak Family Foundation, George Washington University, University of Maryland, National History Center, and the Mexican Cultural Institute.

For questions, please contact conference co-organizers Ralph Bauer (bauerr@umd.edu) or Marcy Norton (mnorton@gwu.edu).

April 9-10:Slavery, Freedom, and the Remaking of American History: A Conference in Honor of Ira Berlin” 

Please join the Department of History of the University of Maryland, College Park on April 9 and 10, 2015 in the McKeldin Library Special Events Room (6137) on the College Park campus, for a conference honoring  the work of Professor Ira Berlin. Entitled Slavery, Freedom, and the Remaking of American History, this event will feature presentations by former students of Dr. Berlin and by past or present members of the Freedmen & Southern Society Project.

The conference is free and open to the public; no registration is required.

April 10: Early Modern Global History Seminar, Georgetown University

T.H. Breen, William Smith Mason Professor of History Emeritus, Northwestern University, “Enforcing the American Revolution: Law and Disorder”

This event will be a talk, not a precirculated paper.

All seminars will meet on the Georgetown campus on Fridays from 4-5:30, followed by a social hour. Papers are circulated in advance. All students, faculty, and independent scholars are invited to attend. Please email Alison Games (gamesa@georgetown.edu) if you wish to have your name added to the seminar’s email list.

April 13: Washington History Seminar

Christopher Darnton (Catholic University) on Rivalry and Alliance Politics in Cold War Latin America

April 15: The George Washington University’s Annual DC Emancipation Day Lecture

“Frederick Douglass’s Tales of Abraham Lincoln”

Drawing from his forthcoming book, The Lives of Frederick Douglass (Harvard, 2016), Robert s. Levine, professor of English at the University of Maryland, will discuss the image of Lincoln emerging from Douglass’s personal and public writing. Levine will revise the mythical ideas of a Lincoln-Douglass “bromance” and instead shed light on a complex relationship that altered the course of history.

The event is free and open to the public. It will be held on April 15, 2015 from 6:00-7:30 pm in the City View Room, 1957 E Street, NW.

April 17: Early American Seminar Series

Christen Mucher (Smith), “Indian Wars and Western Antiquities.” Respondent: Matt Ball (Maryland)

April 20: Washington History Seminar

David Armitage (Harvard University) and Jo Guldi (Brown University), panel discussion of The History Manifesto, with Eric Arnesen (National History Center/George Washington University), John McNeill (Georgetown University) and Rosemarie Zagarri (George Mason University)

April 23: Georgetown Institute for Global History International History Seminar

Carole Fink, Humanities Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the Ohio State University, “How about Normalizing the Past? West Germany, Israel, and the writer Guenter Grass’s first visit in 1967.”

The seminar will meet on Thursday, April 23, 2015 from 6:15-7:45 in ICC 662. Papers will be pre-circulated among participants. Light refreshments will be served.

(Co-sponsored by the Center for German and European Studies and the Program for Jewish Civilization)

April 23: German Historical Institute Spring Lecture Series

Laura K. Donahue (Georgetown University) “The History of the Fourth Amendment”

The German Historical Institute’s Spring Lecture Series 2015, “Intelligence Services and Civil Liberties: Security and Privacy in Historical Perspective,” organized in cooperation with the National History Center, seeks to explore these issues in a comparative and historical perspective. Our speakers will examine how democratic governments in Germany, the United States, and Switzerland have grappled with balancing the need for security and citizens’ rights.

All lectures begin at 6:30 pm (refreshments will be served from 6:00 to 6:30 pm) and will be held at the German Historical Institute, 1607 New Hampshire Avenue NW. Please RSVP (acceptances only) by Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.

April 24-25: Annual Meeting of the Society for History in the Federal Government (SHFG)

Annual Meeting, The Society for History in the Federal Government (SHFG) “Across the Great Divide: Historical Research in a Digital World” April 24–25, 2015

April 27: Washington History Seminar

Sulmaan Khan (Tufts University) on Muslim, Trader, Nomad, Spy: China’s Cold War and the People of the Tibetan Borderlands

April 30: Diaghilev’s “Time Travelling” Italian Scores

Kluge Fellow Elia Corazza investigates the collaboration between Serge Diaghilev, founder of The Ballets Russes, and the Italian composer Ottorino Respighi. Corazza explores their contributions to the changes to musical style that followed the First World War, such as the emergence of the so-called neoclassicism, and argues that this stylistic shift inaugurated a new repertory of modernist music for ballet based on pre-romantic models.

The talk will be held at 4:00p.m. on April 30, 2015 in LJ-113 on the first floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress.

MAY 2015

May 1: Early American Seminar Series 

Noeleen McIlvenna (Wright State), “Colonial Democrats.” Respondent: Lucien Holness (Maryland)

May 4: Washington History Seminar

Doug Rossinow (Metropolitan State University) on The Reagan Era: A History of the 1980s

May 7: Navigating the Blood-Dimmed Tides: Was U.S. Military Intervention in the First World War Worth the Cost?

Using his extensive background in strategy and history, Kissinger Chair Bradford Lee examines the objectives, costs, and eventual outcomes of America’s involvement in the First World War.

The talk will be held at 4:00p.m. on May 7, 2015 in LJ-119 on the first floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress.

May 8: Congressional Briefing on American Families, Global Competition, and Comprehensive Tax Reform in Historical Perspective

The briefing, co-sponsored by the Joint Committee on Taxation and and the National History Center, will be held at 10 a.m. on May 8 in Room 2103 of the Rayburn House Office Building.

May 8: Georgetown Institute for Global History Russian History Seminar

May 8. Nicole Eaton (Kennan Institute/Wesleyan). “Between Rehabilitation and Revenge: The Fate of Kaliningrad’s Germans, 1945-1948”

The seminar will meet on Friday, May 8, 2015 from 5:00-6:15 in Georgetown University ICC 662. Papers will be pre-circulated among participants. Light refreshments will be served. Those interested in receiving notification by email and/or participating should contact Michael David-Fox, md672@georgetown.edu.

May 11: Washington History Seminar

James Loeffler (University of Virginia) on The Sovereignty of a Higher Law?: Global Antisemitism and Jewish Politics in the 1960s

May 14: German Historical Institute Spring Lecture Series

Georg Kreis (University of Basel) “Freedom Against Freedom: Swiss State Security in the Cold War Era – and Beyond”

The German Historical Institute’s Spring Lecture Series 2015, “Intelligence Services and Civil Liberties: Security and Privacy in Historical Perspective,” organized in cooperation with the National History Center, seeks to explore these issues in a comparative and historical perspective. Our speakers will examine how democratic governments in Germany, the United States, and Switzerland have grappled with balancing the need for security and citizens’ rights.

All lectures begin at 6:30 pm (refreshments will be served from 6:00 to 6:30 pm) and will be held at the German Historical Institute, 1607 New Hampshire Avenue NW. Please RSVP (acceptances only) by Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.

May 18: Washington History Seminar

Kate Brown (University of Maryland Baltimore County) on Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

To list events, please email Dr. Amanda Moniz at amoniz@historians.org.

May 21: Gerald D. Feldman Memorial Lecture 2015

History Lived and History Written: Germany and the United States, 1945/55-2015

Professor Charles S. Maier is Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History at Harvard University and a renowned expert on the history of 20th-century Europe and the United States. His wide-ranging oeuvre includesRecasting Bourgeois Europe (1975), The Marshall Plan and Germany (1991), Dissolution: The Crisis of Communism and the End of East Germany (1997), and Among Empires: American Ascendancy and its Predecessors (2006).

Please RSVP (acceptances only) by May 14. Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.

June

June 4: German Historical Institute Spring Lecture Series

Loch K. Johnson (University of Georgia) “Security, Privacy, and the German-American Relationship”

The German Historical Institute’s Spring Lecture Series 2015, “Intelligence Services and Civil Liberties: Security and Privacy in Historical Perspective,” organized in cooperation with the National History Center, seeks to explore these issues in a comparative and historical perspective. Our speakers will examine how democratic governments in Germany, the United States, and Switzerland have grappled with balancing the need for security and citizens’ rights.

All lectures begin at 6:30 pm (refreshments will be served from 6:00 to 6:30 pm) and will be held at the German Historical Institute, 1607 New Hampshire Avenue NW. Please RSVP (acceptances only) by Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.