Events Digest

APRIL 2015

April 24-25: Annual Meeting of the Society for History in the Federal Government (SHFG)

Annual Meeting, The Society for History in the Federal Government (SHFG) “Across the Great Divide: Historical Research in a Digital World” April 24–25, 2015

April 27: Washington History Seminar

Sulmaan Khan (Tufts University) on Muslim, Trader, Nomad, Spy: China’s Cold War and the People of the Tibetan Borderlands

April 30: Diaghilev’s “Time Travelling” Italian Scores

Kluge Fellow Elia Corazza investigates the collaboration between Serge Diaghilev, founder of The Ballets Russes, and the Italian composer Ottorino Respighi. Corazza explores their contributions to the changes to musical style that followed the First World War, such as the emergence of the so-called neoclassicism, and argues that this stylistic shift inaugurated a new repertory of modernist music for ballet based on pre-romantic models.

The talk will be held at 4:00p.m. on April 30, 2015 in LJ-113 on the first floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress.

MAY 2015

May 1: Early American Seminar Series 

Noeleen McIlvenna (Wright State), “Colonial Democrats.” Respondent: Lucien Holness (Maryland)

May 4: Washington History Seminar

Doug Rossinow (Metropolitan State University) on The Reagan Era: A History of the 1980s

May 7: Navigating the Blood-Dimmed Tides: Was U.S. Military Intervention in the First World War Worth the Cost?

Using his extensive background in strategy and history, Kissinger Chair Bradford Lee examines the objectives, costs, and eventual outcomes of America’s involvement in the First World War.

The talk will be held at 4:00p.m. on May 7, 2015 in LJ-119 on the first floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress.

May 7: Jewish Consumer Cultures: An Overview of Current Research

Gideon Reuveni, Reader in History and Director of the Centre for German-Jewish Studies at the University of Sussex, will deliver the keynote lecture as part of the conference “Jewish Consumer Cultures in 19th and 20th Century Europe and America” taking place at the German Historical Institute from May 7 to 9, 2015.

The lecture begins at 6:30 pm (refreshments will be served from 6:00 to 6:30 pm) and will be held at the German Historical Institute, 1607 New Hampshire Avenue NW (Directions). Please RSVP (acceptances only) by May 4. Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or E-mail events@ghi-dc.org

May 7-8: 2015 U.S. Capitol Historical Society Annual Symposium “Aftermath: The Consequences of the Civil War for Congress and the Federal Government” 

The Spring 2015 annual symposium will focus on the impact of the Civil War on Congress and the Federal Government. Eight scholars will address various topics including the long range consequences for the Constitution, the economy, the federal bureaucracy, and the war’s impact on Native Americans.

The conference begins on the evening of Thursday May 7 with an opening keynote address by Professor William E. Nelson on the impact of the war on the burgeoning growth of the federal government. A reception will follow Professor Nelson’s talk.

Seven scholars will speak the following day in morning and afternoon sessions to be held in Room G50 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill.

All sessions are free and open to the public. Preregistration is recommended.

Register now online or by calling 202-543-8919 x38.

May 8: Congressional Briefing on American Families, Global Competition, and Comprehensive Tax Reform in Historical Perspective

The briefing, co-sponsored by the Joint Committee on Taxation and and the National History Center, will be held at 10 a.m. on May 8 in Room 2103 of the Rayburn House Office Building.

May 8: Georgetown Institute for Global History Russian History Seminar

May 8. Nicole Eaton (Kennan Institute/Wesleyan). “Between Rehabilitation and Revenge: The Fate of Kaliningrad’s Germans, 1945-1948”

The seminar will meet on Friday, May 8, 2015 from 5:00-6:15 in Georgetown University ICC 662. Papers will be pre-circulated among participants. Light refreshments will be served. Those interested in receiving notification by email and/or participating should contact Michael David-Fox, md672@georgetown.edu.

May 11: Washington History Seminar

James Loeffler (University of Virginia) on The Sovereignty of a Higher Law?: Global Antisemitism and Jewish Politics in the 1960s

May 14: German Historical Institute Spring Lecture Series

Georg Kreis (University of Basel) “Freedom Against Freedom: Swiss State Security in the Cold War Era – and Beyond”

The German Historical Institute’s Spring Lecture Series 2015, “Intelligence Services and Civil Liberties: Security and Privacy in Historical Perspective,” organized in cooperation with the National History Center, seeks to explore these issues in a comparative and historical perspective. Our speakers will examine how democratic governments in Germany, the United States, and Switzerland have grappled with balancing the need for security and citizens’ rights.

All lectures begin at 6:30 pm (refreshments will be served from 6:00 to 6:30 pm) and will be held at the German Historical Institute, 1607 New Hampshire Avenue NW. Please RSVP (acceptances only) by Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.

May 18: Washington History Seminar

Kate Brown (University of Maryland Baltimore County) on Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

To list events, please email Dr. Amanda Moniz at amoniz@historians.org.

May 21: Gerald D. Feldman Memorial Lecture 2015

History Lived and History Written: Germany and the United States, 1945/55-2015

Professor Charles S. Maier is Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History at Harvard University and a renowned expert on the history of 20th-century Europe and the United States. His wide-ranging oeuvre includesRecasting Bourgeois Europe (1975), The Marshall Plan and Germany (1991), Dissolution: The Crisis of Communism and the End of East Germany (1997), and Among Empires: American Ascendancy and its Predecessors (2006).

Please RSVP (acceptances only) by May 14. Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.

June

June 4: German Historical Institute Spring Lecture Series

Loch K. Johnson (University of Georgia) “Security, Privacy, and the German-American Relationship”

The German Historical Institute’s Spring Lecture Series 2015, “Intelligence Services and Civil Liberties: Security and Privacy in Historical Perspective,” organized in cooperation with the National History Center, seeks to explore these issues in a comparative and historical perspective. Our speakers will examine how democratic governments in Germany, the United States, and Switzerland have grappled with balancing the need for security and citizens’ rights.

All lectures begin at 6:30 pm (refreshments will be served from 6:00 to 6:30 pm) and will be held at the German Historical Institute, 1607 New Hampshire Avenue NW. Please RSVP (acceptances only) by Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.

June 11: #Scholarfest

To celebrate the 15th anniversary of The John W. Kluge Center, the Kluge Center hosts the first-ever #ScholarFest, a unique mixture of rapid-fire dialogues, panels and scholarly conversations on a series of thought-provoking topics.

More than 70 top scholars in the humanities and social sciences–all former residents at the Kluge Center–will convene on Capitol Hill for a series of scholarly conversations on matters of importance to academia, the policy community, and the general public. In addition, three previous recipients of the John W. Kluge Prize for Achievement in the Study of Humanity will be in dialogue together for the first time as part of an evening gala event.

At the heart of #ScholarFest are “lightning conversations”, a format that features senior scholars in discussion with younger scholars around large, universal ideas in quick-hitting 10-minute intervals. Themes include:

  • Future definitions of life
  • The ways we write history
  • Personal and cultural identities in a post-modern world
  • Concepts of ethics and morality
  • Notions of world order

The format embodies the core ethos of the Center, namely to foster cross-disciplinary scholarship across multiple generations.