Events Digest

FEBRUARY 2015

February 27: Heather Bamford, George Washington University, works in progress lunch

February 27: Early Modern Global History Seminar, Georgetown University

John. W. O’Malley, University Professor and Department of Theology, Georgetown University, “Art, Controversy, and the Jesuits: The Imago primi saeculi, 1640″

All seminars will meet on the Georgetown campus on Fridays from 4-5:30, followed by a social hour. Papers are circulated in advance. All students, faculty, and independent scholars are invited to attend. Please email Alison Games (gamesa@georgetown.edu) if you wish to have your name added to the seminar’s email list.

MARCH 2015

March 2:Washington History Seminar

Heather Cox Richardson (Boston College) on To Make Men Free: A History of the Republican Party

March 3-4: The NACA Centenary: A Symposium on 100 Years of Aerospace Research and Development

On March 3, 1915, Congress established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, or N-A-C-A, “to separate the real from the imagined and make known the overlooked and unexpected” in the quest for flight. In 1958, the NACA’s staff, research facilities and know-how were transitioned to the new NASA.

From March 3-4, 2015, the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum and the NASA History Program Office will host a special symposium  that commemorates a century of aerospace research and development. The event takes place in the Moving Beyond Earth Gallery, at the Air & Space Museum.  This is a free event, open to the public, but registration is required.  Those who want to attend can simply email their name and affiliation to histinfo@hq.nasa.gov.

March 5-8:  Southern Labor Studies Association Conference

The Southern Labor Studies Association Conference is taking place on the George Washington University campus at the Marvin Center on Thursday evening, March 5 through Sunday midday, March 8.  The theme is “Slavery, Law, Legacy, and Beyond,” and the papers span the 18th through 21st centuries.

The keynote address on Friday is by Craig Becker, a legal scholar, former NLRB member, and current co-counsel of the AFL-CIO, who will speak on “The Labor Question Today”; the keynote on Saturday is by Carol Anderson of Emory University, who will speak on “When the Levees Broke: A History of Un-Civil Rights in America.”

March 9: Washington History Seminar

Carol Anderson (Emory University) on Bourgeois Radicals: The NAACP and the Struggle for Colonial Liberation

March 13: Early American Seminar Series

Nicholas Wood (Virginia), “The Anglo-American ‘Race of Glory’ & the Failure of the Cooperative Slave Trade Suppression.” Respondent: TBA

March 16: Washington History Seminar

William LeoGrande (American University) and Peter Kornbluh (National Security Archive) on Back Channel to Cuba: The Hidden History of Negotiations between Washington and Havana

March 18: Book Signing Lecture: Julia King on George Hadfield: Architect of the Federal City

Dr. Julia King will speak about her recent book, George Hadfield: Architect of the Federal City, at noon on Wednesday, March 18. Hadfield worked on several important structures in the D.C. area, including the Capitol, Arlington House, and Old City Hall.  The event is free and open to the public, though pre-registration is requested. 200 Maryland Ave. NE, Washington, DC 20002.

March 20: Symposium on “Transition, Scale and Catastrophe” 

9-4 PM  International Brotherhood of Teamsters Room, Gelman Library 7th floor, With Stacy Alaimo, Stephanie LeMenager, Steve Mentz, Karl Steel, Anne Harris and filmmaker Lynn Tomlinson.

March 20: Early Modern Global History Seminar, Georgetown University

Jason Sharples, Department of History, Catholic University, “The World That Fear Made: Imagination and Power in Early American Slave Conspiracies”

All seminars will meet on the Georgetown campus on Fridays from 4-5:30, followed by a social hour. Papers are circulated in advance. All students, faculty, and independent scholars are invited to attend. Please email Alison Games (gamesa@georgetown.edu) if you wish to have your name added to the seminar’s email list.

March 23: Washington History Seminar

Martha Hodes (NYU) on Mourning Lincoln   

Report from the Field: Sharita Thompson on the Hill’s Center Emancipation Day program

March 30: Washington History Seminar

Bruce Kuklick (University of Pennsylvania) on Death in the Congo: Murdering Patrice Lumumba

APRIL 2015

April 2: German Historical Institute Spring Lecture Series

Wolfgang Krieger (University of Marburg) “Parliamentary Oversight of Intelligence: The German Experience”

The German Historical Institute’s Spring Lecture Series 2015, “Intelligence Services and Civil Liberties: Security and Privacy in Historical Perspective,” organized in cooperation with the National History Center, seeks to explore these issues in a comparative and historical perspective. Our speakers will examine how democratic governments in Germany, the United States, and Switzerland have grappled with balancing the need for security and citizens’ rights.

All lectures begin at 6:30 pm (refreshments will be served from 6:00 to 6:30 pm) and will be held at the German Historical Institute, 1607 New Hampshire Avenue NW. Please RSVP (acceptances only) by Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.

April 9-10: “Entangled Trajectories: Integrating European and Native American Histories”

Elizabeth Boone will deliver a public lecture at the Mexican Cultural Institute on April 9 at 6:45, and there will be sessions at George Washington University on April 9 and 10. Confirmed speakers include: Ned Blackhawk (Yale University); Galen Brokaw (Montana State University), Margaret Bruchac (University of Pennsylvania), Matt Cohen (University of Texas, Austin), Nancy Farriss (University of Pennsylvania), Karen Graubart (University of Notre Dame), Byron Hamann (Ohio State University), Dana Leibsohn (Smith College), James Maffie (University of Maryland), Barbara Mundy (Fordham), Nancy van Deusen (Queen’s University), Birgit Brander Rasmussen (Yale University), David Silverman, (George Washington University), Molly Warsh  (University of Pittsburgh).

The conference is organized by the Early Americas Working Group and co-sponsored by the Kislak Family Foundation, George Washington University, University of Maryland, National History Center, and the Mexican Cultural Institute.

For questions, please contact conference co-organizers Ralph Bauer (bauerr@umd.edu) or Marcy Norton (mnorton@gwu.edu).

April 10: Early Modern Global History Seminar, Georgetown University

T.H. Breen, William Smith Mason Professor of History Emeritus, Northwestern University, “Enforcing the American Revolution: Law and Disorder”

This event will be a talk, not a precirculated paper.

All seminars will meet on the Georgetown campus on Fridays from 4-5:30, followed by a social hour. Papers are circulated in advance. All students, faculty, and independent scholars are invited to attend. Please email Alison Games (gamesa@georgetown.edu) if you wish to have your name added to the seminar’s email list.

April 13: Washington History Seminar

Christopher Darnton (Catholic University) on Rivalry and Alliance Politics in Cold War Latin America

April 17: Early American Seminar Series

Christen Mucher (Smith), “Indian Wars and Western Antiquities.” Respondent: Matt Ball (Maryland)

April 20: Washington History Seminar

David Armitage (Harvard University) and Jo Guldi (Brown University), panel discussion of The History Manifesto, with Eric Arnesen (National History Center/George Washington University), John McNeill (Georgetown University) and Rosemarie Zagarri (George Mason University)

April 23: 2015 International History Seminar 

Carole Fink, Humanities Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the Ohio State University, “How about Normalizing the Past? West Germany, Israel, and the writer Guenter Grass’s first visit in 1967.”

(Co-sponsored by the Center for German and European Studies and the Program for Jewish Civilization)

April 23: German Historical Institute Spring Lecture Series

Laura K. Donahue (Georgetown University) “The History of the Fourth Amendment”

The German Historical Institute’s Spring Lecture Series 2015, “Intelligence Services and Civil Liberties: Security and Privacy in Historical Perspective,” organized in cooperation with the National History Center, seeks to explore these issues in a comparative and historical perspective. Our speakers will examine how democratic governments in Germany, the United States, and Switzerland have grappled with balancing the need for security and citizens’ rights.

All lectures begin at 6:30 pm (refreshments will be served from 6:00 to 6:30 pm) and will be held at the German Historical Institute, 1607 New Hampshire Avenue NW. Please RSVP (acceptances only) by Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.

April 24-25: Annual Meeting of the Society for History in the Federal Government (SHFG)

Annual Meeting, The Society for History in the Federal Government (SHFG) “Across the Great Divide: Historical Research in a Digital World” April 24–25, 2015

April 27: Washington History Seminar

Sulmaan Khan (Tufts University) on Muslim, Trader, Nomad, Spy: China’s Cold War and the People of the Tibetan Borderlands

MAY 2015

May 1: Early American Seminar Series 

Noeleen McIlvenna (Wright State), “Colonial Democrats.” Respondent: Lucien Holness (Maryland)

May 4: Washington History Seminar

Doug Rossinow (Metropolitan State University) on The Reagan Era: A History of the 1980s

May 11: Washington History Seminar

James Loeffler (University of Virginia) on The Sovereignty of a Higher Law?: Global Antisemitism and Jewish Politics in the 1960s

May 14: German Historical Institute Spring Lecture Series

Georg Kreis (University of Basel) “Freedom Against Freedom: Swiss State Security in the Cold War Era – and Beyond”

The German Historical Institute’s Spring Lecture Series 2015, “Intelligence Services and Civil Liberties: Security and Privacy in Historical Perspective,” organized in cooperation with the National History Center, seeks to explore these issues in a comparative and historical perspective. Our speakers will examine how democratic governments in Germany, the United States, and Switzerland have grappled with balancing the need for security and citizens’ rights.

All lectures begin at 6:30 pm (refreshments will be served from 6:00 to 6:30 pm) and will be held at the German Historical Institute, 1607 New Hampshire Avenue NW. Please RSVP (acceptances only) by Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.

May 18: Washington History Seminar

Kate Brown (University of Maryland Baltimore County) on Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

To list events, please email Dr. Amanda Moniz at amoniz@historians.org.

May 21: Gerald D. Feldman Memorial Lecture 2015

History Lived and History Written: Germany and the United States, 1945/55-2015

Professor Charles S. Maier is Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History at Harvard University and a renowned expert on the history of 20th-century Europe and the United States. His wide-ranging oeuvre includesRecasting Bourgeois Europe (1975), The Marshall Plan and Germany (1991), Dissolution: The Crisis of Communism and the End of East Germany (1997), and Among Empires: American Ascendancy and its Predecessors (2006).

Please RSVP (acceptances only) by May 14. Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.

June

June 4: German Historical Institute Spring Lecture Series

Loch K. Johnson (University of Georgia) “Security, Privacy, and the German-American Relationship”

The German Historical Institute’s Spring Lecture Series 2015, “Intelligence Services and Civil Liberties: Security and Privacy in Historical Perspective,” organized in cooperation with the National History Center, seeks to explore these issues in a comparative and historical perspective. Our speakers will examine how democratic governments in Germany, the United States, and Switzerland have grappled with balancing the need for security and citizens’ rights.

All lectures begin at 6:30 pm (refreshments will be served from 6:00 to 6:30 pm) and will be held at the German Historical Institute, 1607 New Hampshire Avenue NW. Please RSVP (acceptances only) by Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.