Events Digest

JANUARY 2015 

January 12: Washington History Seminar

Robyn Muncy (University of Maryland), on Relentless Reformer: Josephine Roche and the Persistence of Progressivism in Twentieth-Century America

January 15: National Archives Researcher Talks

Rebecca Edwards (Vassar College), on Sex on the Frontier

January 23: Jonathan Hsy, George Washington University, “Ecolinguistics in Theory and Practice” 

January 26: Washington History Seminar

Kathy Peiss (University of Pennsylvania), on Bookmen at War: Libraries, Intelligence, and Cultural Policy in World War II

January 30: Early Modern Global History Seminar, Georgetown University

Surekha Davies, Department of History, Western Connecticut State University, and Kislak Fellow, Kluge Center, Library of Congress, “Spit-roasts or Barbecues? Mapping Brazilian Cannibals”

All seminars will meet on the Georgetown campus on Fridays from 4-5:30, followed by a social hour. Papers are circulated in advance. All students, faculty, and independent scholars are invited to attend. Please email Alison Games (gamesa@georgetown.edu) if you wish to have your name added to the seminar’s email list.

FEBRUARY 2015

February 2:Washington History Seminar

Pawel Machcewicz (Museum of the Second World War, Gdansk) on Poland’s War on Radio Free Europe

February 5: African American History Month Lecture

Kate Masur (Northwestern University) will deliver this annual lecture, co-sponsored by the U.S. Capitol Historical Society and the Illinois State Society of Washington, D.C., at noon on Thursday, February 5. Masur, author of An Example for All the Land: Emancipation and the Struggle over Equality in Washington, D.C., will speak about emancipation in the District of Columbia. The event is free and open to the public, though pre-registration is requested. 200 Maryland Ave. NE, Washington, DC 20002.

February 6: Early American Seminar Series

Susan Branson (Syracuse), “Phrenology and the Science of Race in Antebellum America.” Respondent: Ashley Towle (Maryland)

February 7: DC-Area African American Studies Works-In-Progress Seminar

Hoda Zaki (Hood College): “The Afro-Asian Roots of Nonviolence in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement”

Erin Chapman (George Washington University): “Staging Gendered Radicalism: A Raisin in the Sun and Lorraine Hansberry’s Vision of Freedom.”

Mark your calendars!  The next meeting of the DC-Area African American Studies Works-In-Progress Seminar is on Saturday, 7 Feb 2015 from 2-5 pm at the Teamsters’ Archive in George Washington University’s Gellman Library, 7th floor.

February 9: Washington History Seminar

Charles Neu (Brown University) on Colonel House: A Biography of Woodrow Wilson’s Silent Partner

February 13: Ania Loomba, University of Pennsylvania, “Crossing Boundaries: Race, Postcoloniality and the Early Modern.”

February 19:  The 4th Annual George Washington Lecture 

Professor Philip D. Morgan (Johns Hopkins University) “George Washington and His Slaves”

How well did George Washington know his slaves? This lecture will explore this topic, by focusing on particular enslaved individuals and groups on both Mansion Farm and the outlying quarters. George Washington’s life was inextricably entwined with the institution of slavery. Over time, he became further and further immersed in the system; and he and his slaves became ever more entangled with one another. Eventually, he would try to extricate himself from the institution’s embrace, with significant repercussions for himself and for his slaves.

The lecture will be held from 6-7p.m. in the Contenental Ballroom of the George Washington University Marvin Center (800 21st Street, NW, 3rd floor).

A reception will follow the lecture, and Professor Morgan will sign copies of his landmark study, Slave Counterpoint: Black Culture in the Eighteenth-Century Chesapeake & Lowcountry (Chapel Hill, 1998).

February 23: Washington History Seminar

Bartholomew Sparrow (University of Texas) on The Strategist: Brent Scowcroft and the Call of National Security

February 24: The 2015 Elmer Louis Kayser Memorial Lecture

Globalization and History: New Paradigm or Trojan Horse?

Lecture by Lynn Hunt, the Distinguished Research Professor & Eugen Weber Endowed Chair in Modern European History at UCLA

In addition to the recently published Writing History in the Global Era (2014), Hunt is the author of Measuring Time: Making History (2008), and, Bernard Picart and the First Global Vision of Religion (with M. Jacob and W. Mijnhardt, 2010). She has written extensively on the French Revolution: Revolution and Urban Politics in Provincial France (1978); Politics, Culture, and Class in the French Revolution (1984); and The Family Romance of the French Revolution (1992). She has also written about historical method and epistemology: The New Cultural History (1989); and with Joyce Appleby and Margaret Jacob, Telling the Truth about History.

The lecture will take place on Tuesday, February 24, at 5:00 pm in Room 307 of the Marvin Center at the George Washington University.

All are invited. Please announce to your students and colleagues!  A flyer is forthcoming.

February 27: Heather Bamford, George Washington University, works in progress lunch

February 27: Early Modern Global History Seminar, Georgetown University

John. W. O’Malley, University Professor and Department of Theology, Georgetown University, “Art, Controversy, and the Jesuits: The Imago primi saeculi, 1640″

All seminars will meet on the Georgetown campus on Fridays from 4-5:30, followed by a social hour. Papers are circulated in advance. All students, faculty, and independent scholars are invited to attend. Please email Alison Games (gamesa@georgetown.edu) if you wish to have your name added to the seminar’s email list.

MARCH 2015

March 2:Washington History Seminar

Heather Cox Richardson (Boston College) on To Make Men Free: A History of the Republican Party

March 9: Washington History Seminar

Carol Anderson (Emory University) on Bourgeois Radicals: The NAACP and the Struggle for Colonial Liberation

March 13: Early American Seminar Series

Nicholas Wood (Virginia), “The Anglo-American ‘Race of Glory’ & the Failure of the Cooperative Slave Trade Suppression.” Respondent: TBA

March 16: Washington History Seminar

William LeoGrande (American University) and Peter Kornbluh (National Security Archive) on Back Channel to Cuba: The Hidden History of Negotiations between Washington and Havana

March 18: Book Signing Lecture: Julia King on George Hadfield: Architect of the Federal City

Dr. Julia King will speak about her recent book, George Hadfield: Architect of the Federal City, at noon on Wednesday, March 18. Hadfield worked on several important structures in the D.C. area, including the Capitol, Arlington House, and Old City Hall.  The event is free and open to the public, though pre-registration is requested. 200 Maryland Ave. NE, Washington, DC 20002.

March 20: Symposium on “Transition, Scale and Catastrophe” 

9-4 PM  International Brotherhood of Teamsters Room, Gelman Library 7th floor, With Stacy Alaimo, Stephanie LeMenager, Steve Mentz, Karl Steel, Anne Harris and filmmaker Lynn Tomlinson.

March 20: Early Modern Global History Seminar, Georgetown University

Jason Sharples, Department of History, Catholic University, “The World That Fear Made: Imagination and Power in Early American Slave Conspiracies”

All seminars will meet on the Georgetown campus on Fridays from 4-5:30, followed by a social hour. Papers are circulated in advance. All students, faculty, and independent scholars are invited to attend. Please email Alison Games (gamesa@georgetown.edu) if you wish to have your name added to the seminar’s email list.

March 23: Washington History Seminar

Martha Hodes (NYU) on Mourning Lincoln   

Report from the Field: Sharita Thompson on the Hill’s Center Emancipation Day program

March 30: Washington History Seminar

Bruce Kuklick (University of Pennsylvania) on Death in the Congo: Murdering Patrice Lumumba

APRIL 2015

April 9-10: “Entangled Trajectories: Integrating European and Native American Histories”

Elizabeth Boone will deliver a public lecture at the Mexican Cultural Institute on April 9 at 6:45, and there will be sessions at George Washington University on April 9 and 10. Confirmed speakers include: Ned Blackhawk (Yale University); Galen Brokaw (Montana State University), Margaret Bruchac (University of Pennsylvania), Matt Cohen (University of Texas, Austin), Nancy Farriss (University of Pennsylvania), Karen Graubart (University of Notre Dame), Byron Hamann (Ohio State University), Dana Leibsohn (Smith College), James Maffie (University of Maryland), Barbara Mundy (Fordham), Nancy van Deusen (Queen’s University), Birgit Brander Rasmussen (Yale University), David Silverman, (George Washington University), Molly Warsh  (University of Pittsburgh).

The conference is organized by the Early Americas Working Group and co-sponsored by the Kislak Family Foundation, George Washington University, University of Maryland, National History Center, and the Mexican Cultural Institute.

For questions, please contact conference co-organizers Ralph Bauer (bauerr@umd.edu) or Marcy Norton (mnorton@gwu.edu).

April 10: Early Modern Global History Seminar, Georgetown University

T.H. Breen, William Smith Mason Professor of History Emeritus, Northwestern University, “Enforcing the American Revolution: Law and Disorder”

This event will be a talk, not a precirculated paper.

All seminars will meet on the Georgetown campus on Fridays from 4-5:30, followed by a social hour. Papers are circulated in advance. All students, faculty, and independent scholars are invited to attend. Please email Alison Games (gamesa@georgetown.edu) if you wish to have your name added to the seminar’s email list.

April 13: Washington History Seminar

Christopher Darnton (Catholic University) on Rivalry and Alliance Politics in Cold War Latin America

April 17: Early American Seminar Series

Christen Mucher (Smith), “Indian Wars and Western Antiquities.” Respondent: Matt Ball (Maryland)

April 20: Washington History Seminar

David Armitage (Harvard University) and Jo Guldi (Brown University), panel discussion of The History Manifesto, with Eric Arnesen (National History Center/George Washington University), John McNeill (Georgetown University) and Rosemarie Zagarri (George Mason University)

April 23: 2015 International History Seminar 

Carole Fink, Humanities Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the Ohio State University, “How about Normalizing the Past? West Germany, Israel, and the writer Guenter Grass’s first visit in 1967.”

(Co-sponsored by the Center for German and European Studies and the Program for Jewish Civilization)

April 24-25: Annual Meeting of the Society for History in the Federal Government (SHFG)

Annual Meeting, The Society for History in the Federal Government (SHFG) “Across the Great Divide: Historical Research in a Digital World” April 24–25, 2015

April 27: Washington History Seminar

Sulmaan Khan (Tufts University) on Muslim, Trader, Nomad, Spy: China’s Cold War and the People of the Tibetan Borderlands

MAY 2015

May 1: Early American Seminar Series 

Noeleen McIlvenna (Wright State), “Colonial Democrats.” Respondent: Lucien Holness (Maryland)

May 4: Washington History Seminar

Doug Rossinow (Metropolitan State University) on The Reagan Era: A History of the 1980s

May 11: Washington History Seminar

James Loeffler (University of Virginia) on The Sovereignty of a Higher Law?: Global Antisemitism and Jewish Politics in the 1960s

May 18: Washington History Seminar

Kate Brown (University of Maryland Baltimore County) on Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters

To list events, please email Dr. Amanda Moniz at amoniz@historians.org.

May 21: Gerald D. Feldman Memorial Lecture 2015

History Lived and History Written: Germany and the United States, 1945/55-2015

Professor Charles S. Maier is Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History at Harvard University and a renowned expert on the history of 20th-century Europe and the United States. His wide-ranging oeuvre includesRecasting Bourgeois Europe (1975), The Marshall Plan and Germany (1991), Dissolution: The Crisis of Communism and the End of East Germany (1997), and Among Empires: American Ascendancy and its Predecessors (2006).

Please RSVP (acceptances only) by May 14. Tel. 202.387.3355, Fax 202.387.6437 or  E-mail.