Posts Tagged ‘Roger Louis’

Sixth International Seminar on Decolonization Participants Announced

Monday, February 14th, 2011

Participants for the Sixth International Seminar on Decolonization have been chosen.  The seminar, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and hosted by the John W. Kluge Center of the Library of Congress, brings together fifteen scholars at the beginning of their careers to Washington, DC for the summer.  The four-week program consists of class meetings, public lectures, informal gatherings, and research in the Washington area on decolonization in the twentieth century.  It begins in mid-July and runs through the first week of August and has become an important stage is many young historians’ career.

This year, the seminar is directed by Wm. Roger Louis (University of Texas at Austin), with leadership help from  John Darwin (Nuffield College, University of Oxford), Philippa Levine (University of Texas at Austin), Jason Parker (Texas A & M University), and Pillarisetti Sudhir (American Historical Association).

The 2011 participants and topics are:

Amanda Behm, Ph.D. candidate, British and imperial history, Yale University (degree expected 2012).
“The Third British Empire: history, theory and reality”

Eveline Buchheim (Ph.D., Social Sciences, University of Amsterdam, 2009), Researcher, NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, The Netherlands.
“Passion and Purpose: Intimacies of Decolonization”

Paul Chamberlin (Ph.D., Diplomatic / International History, the Ohio State University, 2009), Assistant Professor of History, University of Kentucky.
“New Imperial Frontiers: The End of the Cold War and the Struggle for the Middle East, 1972-1982″

Jessica Chapman (Ph.D., History, University of California–Santa Barbara, 2006), Assistant Professor of History, Williams College, Massachusetts.
“From Disorder to Dictatorship: The Domestic and International History of Ngo Dinh Diem’s Construction of South Vietnam, 1953-1956”

Mads Clausen (Ph.D., English, U. of Copenhagen, 2010), Assistant Professor of British and American Politics and History, Aarhus University, Denmark.
“Out of the Ashcan of History: Decolonisation, Regional Engagement and Australian Post-Imperial Nationhood, 1956-1972”

Chris Dietrich, Ph.D. candidate, History, University of Texas–Austin (expected 2011).
“In the Wake of Withdrawal: British Decolonization and the International Energy Politics, 1967-1971”

Matthew Heaton (Ph.D., History, University of Texas–Austin, 2008), Assistant Professor of History, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
“The Decolonization of Psychiatry in the British Empire, 1945-1979”

Jon Howlett, Ph.D. candidate, History, Bristol University, UK (expected 2011).
“‘Decolonising Shanghai:’ the American experience of the takeover of Shanghai and the purge of foreign influence in the city”

Su Lin Lewis (Ph.D., History, University of Cambridge, 2010), Past and Present Post-doctoral Fellow, Institute of Historical Research, UK.
“Cultural International and Civil Society Networks in 1950s Southeast Asia”

Moritz Mihatsch, D.Phil. candidate, History, Nuffield College, University of Oxford (expected 2012).
“Colonialism, Neocolonialism and the United States: How the Sudanese Political Parties dealt with Aid and Technical Assistance”

Lata Parwani, Ph.D. candidate, Modern South Asia History, Tufts University (expected 2012).
“From Homeland to Motherland: Reflecting on the Sindhi Hindu Exodus, 1947-49”

Justin Pearce, D.Phil candidate, Politics, St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford (expected 2011),
“Decolonisation in Angola and the roots of civil war”

Muhammad Ali Raza, D.Phil candidate, Modern South Asian History, St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford (expected 2011).
“Yearning for Freedom and Revolution: Indian Radicals in Moscow during the Interwar Period”

Anne-Isabelle Richard (Ph.D., History, Gonville and Caius College, Univeristy of Cambridge, 2010), Max Weber Fellow, European University Institute.
“How Europe needed Africa: The influence of decolonization in Asia on Eurafrican projects in France, 1945-1954”

Matthew Stanard (Ph.D., Modern European History, Indiana University, 2006), Assistant Professor of History, Berry College, Georgia.
“Belgium’s pro-empire propaganda and official U.S. views of decolonization in the Belgian Congo, 1955-1961″

National History Center Introduces a Weekly History Seminar

Monday, January 18th, 2010

The National History Center and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars will launch a weekly history seminar to be held in Washington, DC, beginning in January 2010. The purpose of the seminar is to promote discussion of ongoing and significant historical research.

The seminars will be co-chaired by Wm. Roger Louis, Director of the National History Center, and Christian Ostermann, Director of the History and Public Policy Program at the Wilson Center. Each seminar will take place weekly on Mondays at 4:00 p.m. at the Wilson Center, located at 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, in Washington, DC.

The seminar is open to the public, but reservations are required because of limited space.

The National History Center is dedicated to the advancement of historical knowledge at all times and in all places, ancient and medieval as well as modern—and not only in colleges and universities, but also in government, journalism, and the public at large. The aim is to foster worldwide understanding of the present in light of the past.

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is the national memorial honoring President Woodrow Wilson. It provides an essential link between the world of ideas and public policy. The Wilson Center fosters relevant research and dialogue to enhance the capabilities and knowledge of leaders, citizens, and institutions worldwide. Created by an act of Congress, the Center is a non-partisan institution.

For further information or to make a reservation, contact: Miriam Cunningham, assistant director of the National History Center, at 202-544-2422 ext 103 or mcunningham [at] historians [dot] org.

Please note that the schedule is subject to change.  Check back with the National History Center for the most up-to-date information.

Schedule for the Weekly History Seminar

Click on the schedule to view larger

Center Receives $1.457 Million from Mellon For Continued Decolonization Seminar

Tuesday, December 1st, 2009

The National History Center has received an additional $1.457 million from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to continue its highly successful international summer seminars focusing on decolonization in the Twentieth Century. These seminars have been instrumental in creating a new international field of knowledge. This targeted study of the dissolution of the colonial empires and the lasting effects of their transformations has resulted in intensive scholarly exchange from among the participants, the leaders, and has produced a new body of scholarship devoted to the subject matter. The continued support from the Mellon Foundation sustains the historical analysis on this important subject as well as the work and careers of the young historians.

The seminars will continue to be held in Washington, D.C. in July 2011–2015 and to bring international historians at the beginning of their careers to the Library of Congress to examine the global phenomena of the collapse of the empires and colonial system.

Having just completed the fourth seminar, which ran July 5 through August 1st, Roger Louis, founding director of the Center and leader of the decolonization seminars, stated “The renewal of Mellon Foundation grant is an exhilarating vote of confidence for those who have worked very hard over the last four years to make the decolonization seminar a success, above all the seminar participants themselves.  The National History Center is proud to have helped the research and writing of young historians working in an emerging field of historical knowledge.”

2010 Decolonization Seminar Applications Now Being Accepted

Monday, August 17th, 2009

The National History Center is now accepting applications for the fifth international summer seminar on decolonization in the 20th century, which will be held for four weeks, from Sunday, July 11, through Saturday, August 7, 2010, in Washington, D.C.  The deadline is November 2, 2009.

Download 2010 Seminar Application Details, Background, and Structure

Download 2010 Letters of Recommendation Guidelines

The international seminar, organized by the National History Center in collaboration with the American Historical Association and the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress, is funded by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. In the fifth seminar in the series, fifteen participating historians will engage in the common pursuit of knowledge about various dimensions of decolonization, primarily 20th-century transitions from colonies to nations in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean.

Aims: The seminar will be an opportunity for the participants (a) to pursue research at the Library of Congress, the National Archives, and other repositories of historical research materials in Washington, D.C., on projects within the overarching theme of decolonization; (b) to exchange ideas among themselves and with the seminar leaders; (c) to produce a draft article or chapter of a book with the guidance of the faculty leaders, who, together with the participants themselves, will offer comments and critiques on the evolving draft papers.

When preparing their applications, applicants may find it helpful to consult the following guides to research resources in Washington, D.C., and elsewhere:

Archives and research resources in Washington, D.C.

American Historical Association’s Archives Wiki

Seminar Leaders: Wm. Roger Louis, Kerr Professor of English History and Culture and Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Texas at Austin (and the executive director of the National History Center), will direct the seminar. Other seminar leaders will include Dane Kennedy (George Washington Univ.), Philippa Levine (Univ. of Southern California/Univ. of Texas at Austin), Jason Parker (Texas A & M Univ.), Pillarisetti Sudhir (AHA), and Marilyn Young (NYU).

Applications and all supporting materials should reach the Assistant Director of the National History Center by November 2, 2009. They may be e-mailed to decol2010apply@nationalhistorycenter.org or to Miriam Hauss Cunningham.

If e-mailing is not possible, the applications may be mailed to:

The National History Center

ATTN: Decolonization Seminar

400 A Street, SE

Washington, DC 20003-3889

General Seminar Information: The 15 participants selected to participate in the four-week seminar will receive a small stipend that is intended to cover daily living expenses (food, local travel, and so on). The Center will meet the costs of accommodation that the Center will arrange. The Center will also reimburse (subject to limits) travel costs incurred by the selected participants for traveling between their workplace or place of normal residence and Washington, D.C., and back.

Requirements: Applicants should either have a recent PhD (no more than 5 years out) and be at the beginning of their careers or advanced PhD students who are nearing completion of their dissertations are also encouraged.

Applicants should note that all the academic activities (including discussions and written work) will be in English. Applicants must, therefore, be fluent in English.

Those selected will have to undertake that they will actively participate in the seminar for its entire duration.

Selected foreign participants must make their own arrangements to obtain the necessary U.S. visas; the National History Center will provide any documentation that may be required.

Founding Director Wins Teaching Award

Tuesday, March 17th, 2009
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Professor Wm. Roger Louis is the 2009 University of Texas Professor of the Year

The National History Center’s Founding Director, Professor Wm. Roger Louis, Kerr Chair of British History at the University of Texas at Austin, is the 2009 recipient of the Professor of the Year Award. The Senate of College Councils, the student governance organization that represents its 50,000 students at the University of Texas in academic affairs, grants the awards to faculty members nominated by UT students who have demonstrated outstanding teaching ability and a continuing dedication to students.

In the nomination letter, Pranav Merchant from the Liberal Arts Council praised Professor Louis because of his ability to engage his students “in the course material by using his wealth of knowledge to find topics that are important and that students will find interesting.”

“Ultimately,” Merchant continued, “Professor Louis cares about students and cares about his field of study, and he excels in teaching and has contributed immensely to British Studies. Because of all of this, he creates a unique academic and social experience that enriches everyone who comes into contact with him.”

In addition to recognizing excellence in teaching, the Senate of College Councils sought to select a professor committed to have a significant impact in the educational experience and possibly even affect the lives of his or her students. The award was the first of its kind, and it represented an effort by the student Senate to encourage the creation of an official award nominated directly from University of Texas students to recognize faculty.

2009 Decolonization Seminar Applications Now Being Accepted

Tuesday, July 29th, 2008

The National History Center is now accepting applications for the fourth international summer seminar on decolonization in the 20th century, which will be held July 5 to August 1, 2009, in Washington, D.C.

The international seminar, organized by the National History Center in collaboration with the American Historical Association and the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress, is funded by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. In the fourth seminar in the series, as in the previous three, fifteen participating historians will engage in the common pursuit of knowledge about various dimensions of decolonization, primarily 20th-century transitions from colonies to nations in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean At the same time, participants will conduct research in the Library of Congress, the National Archives, and other repositories of research materials in Washington, D.C.

Wm. Roger Louis, chair of the National History Center’s board of trustees, Kerr Professor of English History and Culture, and Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Texas at Austin, will direct the seminar. Other seminar leaders will include Dane Kennedy (George Washington Univ.), Philippa Levine (Univ. of Southern California), Jason Parker (Texas A & M Univ.), and Pillarisetti Sudhir (AHA).

Applications and all supporting materials should reach the Administrative Officer of the National History Center by November 3, 2008. They may be e-mailed to decol09apply@nationalhistorycenter.org or mhauss@historians.org. If e-mailing is not possible, the applications may be mailed to The National History Center, 400 A Street, SE, Washington, DC 20003-3889.

General Seminar Information: The 15 participants selected to participate in the four-week seminar will receive a small stipend that is intended to cover daily living expenses (food, local travel, and so on). The Center will meet the costs of accommodation that the Center will arrange. The Center will also reimburse (subject to limits) travel costs incurred by the selected participants for traveling between their workplace or place of normal residence and Washington, D.C., and back.

Aims: The seminar will be an opportunity for the participants (a) to pursue research at the Library of Congress, the National Archives, and other repositories of historical research materials in Washington, D.C., on projects within the overarching theme of decolonization; (b) to exchange ideas among themselves and with the seminar leaders; (c) to produce a draft article or chapter of a book with the guidance of the faculty leaders, who, together with the participants themselves, will offer comments and critiques on the evolving draft papers.

Requirements: Applicants should preferably have a recent PhD (that is, one obtained after January 1, 2002) and be at the beginning of their careers. Applications from advanced PhD students who are nearing completion of their dissertations are also encouraged.

Applicants should note that all the academic activities (including discussions and written work) will be in English. Applicants must, therefore, be fluent in English.

Those selected will have to undertake that they will actively participate in the seminar for its entire duration.

Selected foreign participants must make their own arrangements to obtain the necessary U.S. visas; the National History Center will provide any documentation that may be required.

2009 Seminar Details
Application Procedures
Letters of Recommendation Guidelines

Archives and Research resources in Washington, D.C.

American Historical Association’s Archives Wiki

“United Nations and Palestine in 1947″: Lecture with Roger Louis

Wednesday, July 16th, 2008

Wm. Roger Louis gave a lecture at the Library of Congress on Wednesday, July 16, 2008. The lecture, co-sponsored by the John W. Kluge Center at the Library and given in conjunction with the third international seminar on decolonization, was entitled “The Moral Conscience of the World: The United Nations and Palestine in 1947.” The lecture was webcasted by the Library and can be viewed here.

Professor Wm. Roger Louis is the Kerr Chair of English History and Culture at the University of Texas at Austin is the author or editor of approximately 30 books, including
his recent book of collected essays, Ends of British Imperialism: The Scramble for Empire, Suez and Decolonization. Louis is the founding director of the National History Center. He is also a member of the Scholars’ Council of the Library of Congress and currently the chairman of the U.S. State Department’s Historical Advisory Committee. Professor Louis is a past president of the American Historical Association (2001).

This lecture examined the Palestine crisis of 1947 and the creation of the Jewish state in the next year marked the beginning of a critical episode in the changing colonial world order. The question of partition tested the principle of self-determination. The debate on these issues in 1947 had enduring significance. In the context of the dissolution of the British Empire, the United Nations played a vital part in the creation of the state of Israel.

Questions and answers followed the presentation.

Also as part of the seminar, Dane Kennedy gave a lecture on Decolonization and Disorder on July 9.