May 5: Thomas Boghardt on “Covert Legions: U.S. Army Intelligence and the Defense of Europe, 1944-1949”

As the Third Reich collapsed, Soviet forces moved deep into Central Europe, and the United States had to adjust rapidly to the new political landscape.  The intelligence services of the U.S. Army assumed a key role in informing Washington national security policy toward Europe during this critical period.  This presentation discusses the early Cold War operations of U.S. Army intelligence as it sought to apprehend war criminals, suppress Nazi subversion, contain communism, and monitor the Red Army.”

Dr. Thomas Boghardt is a senior historian at the U.S. Army Center of Military History, where he focuses on U.S. military intelligence operations in postwar Europe. Prior to this, he served as the historian at the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C., and as a Thyssen fellow at Georgetown University. Dr. Boghardt is the author of several books, including The Zimmermann Telegram (2012) and Spies of the Kaiser (2005).  He received his Ph.D. in modern European history from the University of Oxford.

The Washington History Seminar, a joint venture of the National History Center of the American Historical Association and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, meets at 4 p.m. in the 6th Floor Moynihan Boardroom at the Wilson Center in the Ronald Reagan Building, 13th and Pennsylvania, NW, Federal Triangle Metro Stop. Reservations are requested because of limited seating: WHS@wilsoncenter.org

The seminar thanks the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations for its support.

 

 

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