Category Archives: Congressional Briefings

The National History Center’s Congressional Briefings are designed to provide historical context and perspective on current issues for policy makers and members of their staff. The speakers reflect upon historical events and developments that have influenced the evolution of current policies and provide knowledge pertinent to the consideration of policy alternatives.

History on the Hill

The Center is pleased to announce the launch of our new monthly newsletter, History on the Hill.  The newsletter provides historical insight on contemporary concerns and will be released on the last Friday of every month. Our next newsletter will be released on July 27.

The first edition of History on the Hill provided historical context for issues like immigration, the opioid epidemic, and more.  You can read the June edition of the newsletter here.

We hope that you’ll sign up!

Congressional Briefing on Higher Education

The Center’s recent congressional briefing on the history of higher education drew a large and engaged audience of staffers and other policy specialists.  Historians Patricia Graham (Harvard) and John Thelin (University of Kentucky) briefed the audience on the history of the Higher Education Act of 1965, changes and re-authorizations made to the act, and the long-term impact of the federal government’s involvement in higher learning.

You can view a recording of this event in C-SPAN’s video library.

“What Graham’s and Thelin’s remarks made clear is that the federal government has been instrumental in transforming higher education from the exclusive preserve of young white male elites to an instrument of social opportunity for Americans of all social classes, ethnicities, and genders.” Read Director Dane Kennedy’s recap, “How the Feds Reshaped Higher Education,” on AHA Today.

Teaching Decolonization Resource Collection

The Center is pleased to announce the official launch of our Teaching Decolonization Resource Collection. This digital collection provides instructors, students, and researchers with a wide range of materials to support and encourage the study of decolonization in the classroom. Program assistant Annabel LaBrecque wrote about the project for AHA Today. You can read her post here.

Check out the collection here! The site contains primary and secondary sources organized by region and by theme, as well as supplemental reading materials designed for instructors.