Gabriel Gorodetsky Discusses Stalin and the Russian Imperial Legacy

Historian Gabriel Gorodetsky is featured at the next Washington History Seminar on Monday, March 21 at 4:00 pm at the Wilson Center.  He will address “The Russian Imperial Legacy– Stalin and the Outbreak of the War in the East: Barbarossa.”

Few events in the history of the twentieth century are as controversial, politicized and laden with emotions as is the launching of operation Barbarossa—the German Invasion of Russia. It has become a fertile ground for conspiracy theories and a subject of unending polemics.  This seminar presentation will discuss a vital but missing dimension: the subjugation of ideological premises to the everlasting Russian imperial legacy as the driving force behind Stalin’s policies on the eve of operation Barbarossa.

Gabriel Gorodetsky is a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, and a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He was the founder and director of the Cummings Center for Russian Studies at Tel Aviv University and was a Wilson Center fellow.  His books include Stafford Cripps’ Mission to Moscow, 1940-42 (1986), and Grand Delusion: Stalin and the German Invasion of Russia (1999).

Reservations are requested because of limited seating.  To reserve a seat at the seminar, contact Miriam Cunningham at 202-544-2422 ext 103.  The seminar takes place at the Wilson Center, located in the Ronald Reagan Building at 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW (Federal Triangle Metro stop).

The seminar is sponsored jointly by the National History Center (an initiative of the American Historical Association) and the Wilson Center and facilitates the understanding of contemporary affairs in light of historical knowledge of all times and places, and from multiple perspectives Click for the Spring 2011 schedule and topics, as well as links to videos of past presentations. The seminar is grateful for the support given by the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations.

 

 

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