Tag Archives: Summer Institute

Philippa Levine to Give Second Decolonization Lecture

As part of the National History Center’s ongoing Decolonization Lecture Series, Professor Philippa Levine, Professor of History at the University of Southern California, will give a lecture on Still Invisible?: 
Women, Gender, and Decolonization this Wednesday, July 15, 2009 4:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

The lecture will be in room 119, Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 101 Independence Avenue, SE.

This lecture will ask why studies of decolonization so rarely explore the contributions of women to decolonization struggles around the world, from the perspective both of women involved in anti-colonial movements and women who were part of the colonial authority structure. It will offer examples of women in both these roles, and hopes to encourage researchers to open up this fascinating field for further study.

Philippa Levine is Professor of History at the University of Southern California. She received her Doctorate in Philosophy from St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford, in 1983. She is a member of the Editorial Board for the Journal of British Studies and Women’s History Review, and President-elect of the North American Conference on British Studies. She is also a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. She is currently president of the University of Southern California faculty. Professor Levine’s works include Feminist Lives in Victorian England: Private Roles and Public Commitment; Victorian Feminism 1850-1900; Women’s Suffrage in the British Empire: Citizenship, Nation and Race (co-edited with Laura Mayhall and Ian Fletcher); Prostitution, Race and Politics: Policing Venereal Disease in the British Empire; and The British Empire: Sunrise to Sunset.

A question and answer sesssion will follow the presentation. Complimentary light refreshments will be served.

Co-sponsored by the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress

American Immigration Revisited Institute Participants Announced

Twenty-five participants have been selected from a national pool of over seventy-five applicants to attend the NEH Summer Institute “American Immigration Revisited.” The twenty-five participants selected represent a wide variety of scholarship, college teaching experience, and backgrounds. The institute, organized by the National History Center, is one of 19 summer study opportunities supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, a federal agency that each summer supports seminars and institutes at colleges and universities so that teachers can work in collaboration and study with experts in humanities disciplines. The program is also co-sponsored by the American Historical Association, the history department at American University, the Community College Humanities Association, the Immigration and Ethnic History Society, and the National Portrait Gallery.

 Directed by Maureen Murphy Nutting, Professor of History at North Seattle Community College, and Alan Kraut, Professor of History at American University, the month-long program will bring together 25 two- and four-year college professors and immigration experts for four weeks at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The participants and the institute leaders will also take a three-day research trip to New York City to explore the immigrant experience of Ellis Island, Liberty Island, and the Downtown Tenement Museum.

The participants will explore four basic areas during the summer institute: American immigration part of a global phenomenon; migrations between cultures; changes in immigration law, policy, and practice; and approaches and resources for teaching immigration history. Those who complete the institute will take what they learn back to their communities, enrich their U.S. history courses and other courses that deal with immigration, and improve teaching and learning. Those who complete the institute will take what they learn back to their communities, enrich their U.S. history courses, and improve teaching and learning.

The 2009 participants are:

Jamal A. Adam (Minneapolis Community and Technical College)

Jamie R. Aguila (Arizona State University)

 Theresa Alfaro-Velcamp (Sonoma State University)

Katherine Benton-Cohen (Georgetown University)

Peter Catapano (New York City College of Technology)

Fiona Deans Halloran (Eastern Kentucky University)

Mary E. Dillard (Sarah Lawrence College)

Marilyn R. Fischer (University of Dayton)

Natalie J. Friedman (Vassar College)

James V. Gatewood (Antioch University Los Angeles)

Torrie R. Hester (Roanoke College)

Ely M. Janis (Gonzaga University)

Alison M. Kibler (Franklin and Marshall College)

Patrick J. McGarrity (Southwestern Illinois College)

Steven P. O’Hara (Xavier University)

Michael Ornelas (San Diego Mesa College)

Lisa L. Ossian (Des Moines Area Community College)

Lori A. Pierce (DePaul University)

Steve J. Potts (Hibbing Community College)

Gary W. Shanafelt (McMurry University)

Tiffany A. Trimmer (Bowling Green State University)

Martin Valadez (Columbia Basin College)

FlorenceMae Waldron (Franklin and Marshall College)

Cadence A. Wynter (Columbia College Chicago)

Solveig P. Zempel, (St. Olaf College)

American Immigration Revisited: A NEH Summer Institute

The National History Center invites applications from two- and four-year college teachers for a four-week National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute, “American Immigration Revisited,” which as also been designated a “We the People” initiative of the NEH. Maureen Nutting and Alan Kraut will be directing this program from July 6th through 31st at the Library of Congress, with the support of the American Historical AssociationCommunity College Humanities Association, Immigration and Ethnic History Society, and the Library of Congress.

Click here for full details on institute and application process.

Twenty-five Participants will be involved in lectures, panels, discussions, informal exchanges, site visits. In the evening there will be an optional immigration film festival. All activities designed to help explore four basic areas: American immigration as part of a global phenomenon; migrations between cultures; changes in immigration law, policy, and practice; and approaches and resources for teaching immigration history. Participants will have the option of dormitory housing and each participant will receive a modest stipend to cover expenses during the institute’s four weeks.

This institute brings together college teachers with experts in various dimensions of immigration history for four weeks at the Library of Congress and other venues to explore new approaches to the peopling of the United States through migration. Lectures, panels, and site visits are designed to explore four topics: American immigration as a dimension of broader global patterns of human migration; cultural change through migration; shifts in immigration law, policy and practice; and fresh approaches and resources for the teaching of immigration history. In the evening there will be an optional immigration film festival. A three day excursion to New York City will include visits to Ellis Island, Liberty Island, the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, the Bronx’s “Little Italy,” and other ethnic neighborhoods.

Applications are due to the National History Center by March 2, 2009.